Red Franco

Teal Blue And Long John Silver

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Jun 27, 2020
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203
Another step by step that has way too many steps for this here Forum. I will again do it in 2 parts. Although I demonstrate this pattern in red you may dress it in whatever colours suit you. Black or purple make excellent fishing flies and all you need to do is vary your thread and wool to suit. Similarly I show mine on a 3/4" copper tube they may be dressed on tubes of any length, doubles or trebles.



A word to the wise from the very unwise. Tying this pattern induces an awful lot of tension on the tube. They can if not secured extremely well develop a most annoying and frustrating habit of spinning on the mandrel and unwinding themselves. This usually occurs just as you are winding the wire rib. There is nothing more frustrating than having your fly partially explode just as you are about to finish off. It pays dividends to periodically check the tension of the tube on the mandrel and make sure it is absolutely secure. This is particularly true of Veniard tubes as the liners are an extremely poor fit and the main tube tends to spin on them.




Tying Materials


Tube: Veniard Slipstream copper 3/4" long
Thread: Red
Feelers: 3 red game and 3 white cock hackle stalks
Rostrum: The original pattern utilised calf tail. I substitute with cock pheasant centre tail fibres
Body: 4 ply red dyed granny wool
Hackle: Brown cock
Rib: Medium silver wire



Tying Method




Step 1: Secure the tube FIRMLY onto a mandrel. There are a lot of turns of thread in this pattern and the wool and wire need to be wound extremely tightly to prevent them from unwinding. This creates a lot of tension and the tube can spin on the mandrel as you dress and unwind itself - NOT GOOD!!!!!!!









Step 2: Attach red tying thread and wind backwards.









Step 3: Select 3 red game and 3 white cock hackles. Chinese or Indian low grade are perfectly acceptable. Here I show one red game










Step 4: Using finger and thumb gently strip the hackle fibres against their natural bias to remove them. Do not pull too hard or you risk snapping the stalk. Here I leave the fibres on the end for illustration and ease of handling.









Step 5: Tie in the stalk along the tube. Do not be too concerned with how much of the tube you run along since the stalk ends help us for the foundation of the body taper.









Step 6: Repeat the process around the tube with the remaining 5 hackle stalks. I personally prefer to have the bias of the stalks all in the same plane. For one it looks tidier and for two I have looked closely at shrimps and the ones I have observed have the feelers curving the same way as each other. Ultimately its really your own choice.









Step 7: With the feelers now tied in. Trim the waste ends at varying lengths along the tube. Bind down the ends tightly and you should already be able to produce the foundation of the taper effect for the body.









Step 8: Cut a generous bunch of cock pheasant centre tail fibres and tie them in.










Step 9: Repeat this process around the tube to form the rostrum.









Step 10: By trimming the waste ends of the pheasant tails and binding down we can further enhance the profile foundation.






To be continued..............
 

Teal Blue And Long John Silver

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Joined
Jun 27, 2020
Messages
203
Yes it does continue...........


Step 11: Select a generous length of red dyed 4 ply granny wool.









Step 12: Fray the end of the wool and unwind 2 strands tying them in at the front end of teh tube.









Step 13: Wind up and back down the tube once only. This will further enhance the taper and provide a base for the final profile.









Step 14: Wind the thread up and down the body in tight open turns to bind down the wool. Terminate in vront of the rostrum.









Step 15: Tie in a brown cock hackle.









Step 16: Wind the hackle for 4 or 5 turns.









Step 17: Tie in a length of medium silver wire.









Step 18: GENTLY sweep the hackle fibres back with your hand and hold the silver wire. Wind the wool up to the cock hackle. How you now distriibute the wool as you wind it back down to the fron end of the tube will determine your final taper. There are of course numerous methods of achieving this taper used by thousands of different fly dressers. Tied in this fashion I have had salmon rip off the hackle stalks and demolish the hackle at varying points. The body however has never unwound itself.









Step 19: Wind the wire in open turns to form the rib. I suggest that you check both sides of the tube ass you wind the wire. Yiu invariably find that one side may look even and regular whist on the opposite side the ribbing resembles the jam in one of my mothers roly poly cakes. The fish don't care but surely it is better to have a neat regular rib with parity on both sides?









Step 20: Whip finish and varnish. Lots and lots and lots of varnish. 3 or maybe 4 coats for the head. The wool has a tendency to soak up the varnish from the thread at the head. Drown the bugger in the stuff. You know it makes sense.









It still continues.........
 

Teal Blue And Long John Silver

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 27, 2020
Messages
203
Yes it does........


Step 21: Happy fishing to you all.







I do not wish to insult anybodies intelligence by trying to tell any of you how to fish. I will however chance my arm and suggest that the most successful way I have found of fishing it is utilising a really big aerial upstream mend just before the fly hits the water. As it does so take a bvig step down stream and fish it as slow as you are able. This is not my own technique. It is a technique used to deadly effect by the anglers at the very bottom end of the River Tay. It works with this pattern like nothing else I have ever been able to do with it.
 

Teal Blue And Long John Silver

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Joined
Jun 27, 2020
Messages
203
OK, TBand LJS: you've shown us a huge range of terrific flies. What I want to know now is: when you open your massive fly-box, how do you decide which one to try???

Paul

For sea trout it is usually the first fly I get my hand to, double or treble when I open the box for the point fly and always an American Express on the dropper. I will throw a snake fly in the head of a pool where the lively water will work the flexibility to maximum effect. I will stick the black green tagged muddler that I have put up as a step by step if I wanna chase fish topside. Black and yellow needle tube monkey is never too far away either. For salmon its usually an orange or red Pot Bellied Pig, a Snaelda, a Maggie's Shrimp, a Red Francis, one of McPhail's Rumpelstiltskins or maybe a larger black and yellow needle tube. In low water with a single handed rod i will punt with a micro tube of amout 7mm long. I don't tend to fish anything too elaborate or fancy for any species. I do however dress an awful lot of flies :)
 

phl

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Dec 30, 2009
Messages
309
Location
Knaresborough
Aha! Right - I'm off to tie up some American Expresses! They won't look as good as yours, but hopefully will still be good enough.

Paul
 
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