A Bespoke Handbuilt Split cane rod - Courtesy of Watermole

Hoppy

Administrator
Staff member
A split-bamboo, Trout & Grayling dry-fly rod.

This will be an 8', 2-piece rod, about #5 and of medium to fast action.

The handle and fittings, all the silk tyings, finishing and decoration, will be entirely the choice of the winner, to whatever colours and style chosen and entirely unique.

Everything, with the exception of the agate line-guides, will be entirely hand-made throughout by yours truly, the finished article supplied in soft, brushed-cotton container with certificate.

it will take about three months to make..
 

Rockdoc

New member
£250....just to keep it ticking, will be a pretty special bit of kit....be almost afraid to use it!:)
 
W

watermole

Guest
Firstly, many thanks to everyone for all for your bids-it means a lot to know there are so many generous people out there!

My thanks and congratulations to Rockdoc for his winning bid; some preparatory work has in fact, already begun, and be assured, your rod will be made to the best standard, and as soon as it can be.

You will be consulted at every stage of construction and I wish you nothing but the greatest pleasure and 'Tight Lines' when using it..

Again, very many thanks,

David.
 

Tigermoth

New member
Rockdoc.. you will receive something special. The rod that David built me is marvellous. A rare combination of fishing soul and power. You'll look at it and won't want to use it. Then you'll hook a fish with it and you wont want to stop;)
 

Rockdoc

New member
It is an awesome lot and I am still surprised that no-one out bid me for it. Another fiver would have bust my "not Jostuff" budget. Hopefully Jo will grow up and learn with it (as will her mother) on the wee streams in NZ for which all of my current kit will be too big...:)

We haven't got a date yet but hope that by August 2009 we'll be posting of big Taupo rainbows...

Leighton...I never worked for Cossies, just took their money cos they needed someone to do what they couldn't. They filled my role with someone they then spent 10 months trying to get rid of!:D
 
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scrumbag

New member
Construction Methodology

Construction Methodology

WM and Rockdoc

If it's not too much trouble and you don't mind doing it, could you produce a sort of photo diary of the rod being produced? Be really interesting to see how it was done and how the rod takes shape.

Also be nice as the rod is connected with the forum in a very special way...

Regards,

Scrummy
 
S

silverinvicta

Guest
bargains

bargains

Rockdoc.....believe me, you have picked up the bargain of the decade, That rod will be very special indeed... if i had thought for one moment, that i would have used it to its best advantage... you would not have it now.. but a rod such as it, is made to be used, and i don't do enough fishing now, living here..I hope you or yours will use it well...i think you will.:D good luck with it..

A very jealous Si..............;)
 

Rockdoc

New member
WM and Rockdoc

If it's not too much trouble and you don't mind doing it, could you produce a sort of photo diary of the rod being produced? Be really interesting to see how it was done and how the rod takes shape.

Also be nice as the rod is connected with the forum in a very special way...

Regards,

Scrummy
Scrummy,

What a good idea. Do you think you could Watermole? I'd be more that happy for you to do so but it's your skill and handywork that will be on display.:)

AP
 
W

watermole

Guest
Scrummy,

What a good idea. Do you think you could Watermole? I'd be more that happy for you to do so but it's your skill and handywork that will be on display.:)

AP

...Hmmm...not too sure about that..

The processes, ways and means by which a split bamboo rod may be made, are many and varied, depending on whether you are a hobby-ist, like me, or a volume manufacturer.
There are several ways that the amateur rod-maker can harden, split, cut, plane and glue the pieces together, and then build the rod on the result. The resulting performance is influenced by only the very slightest variable in any of these factors, so the maker is constantly striving for consistency and perfection at every step.
Generally speaking, the normal S/C rod, is composed of six equally sized and tapered, equilateral triangles of bamboo, with the curved enamel outwards, which are assembled together to form the hexagon shape. There are other forms, such as quadrilateral rods and also 'quinettes' of five pieces. These are specialist forms, the latter requiring complex and precise planing, and have been devised for their own purpose. Their manufacture is beyond my scope.

The individual pieces of bamboo can be incredibly small, at their tips, and easily broken, until cemented together, which gives them their strength. There are different ways of cutting them to size, to achieve a tolerance of sometimes only 0.002". A former, or planing guide is essential and sometimes it is of steel strips screwed toether, perspex or-in my case-the mahogany former.
This is not the quickest, nor always the best way, but it is the only way I know and so I stay with what I know works.
The former is a perfectly triangular-shaped section of stabilised hardwood, about 2-3" corner-to-corner, and anything up to 5' long. The corners are naturally, 60 degrees and it is this which is extremely carefully, planed, exactly centrally on one edge, to give the desired rate of complex taper+width, of the pieces.

After hardening and splitting, the carefully numbered and colour-coded sections have excess node material removed, then are softened and straightened on the guide, before being glued and firmly tied down on the former, prior to planing-which takes up to two hours per section...if you don't break one, that is..
They are paired up from the start and glued with a special cement, in exactly opposite positions, the nodes matched and spaced 50/50 along the length, the whole shooting match bound about with fine cord, trued up and stretched vertically with calculated weights fixed exactly centrally to the end of the workpiece.

When all is dry, the bindings are removed and the real work of making the rod begins...

....There is far more to it than that, of course, but as you see, it is a lengthy and involved process, and believe me, there is nothing much fascinating about a workbench covered in wood shavings (of which there are a LOT!) and glue & mess everywhere!
Making the ferrules and rod handle involves wood and cork dust everywhere, and brass swarf all over the lathe ..The last place you would want your camera to be near!

So, thank you very kindly for your post, but I would much rather, that when it is finshed, Rockdoc tries it out, catches some fish, and then we can have the right post on it...what it casts and fishes like...and not what it looks like..

With thanks and regards,

wm.
 

Leighton

New member
Leighton...I never worked for Cossies, just took their money cos they needed someone to do what they couldn't. They filled my role with someone they then spent 10 months trying to get rid of!:D
Cant fault it Alex, they could have done with a lot more people like you and & that knew what to do & how to do it, rather than have yes men and paper chasers!!! Rant over:D

I didnt realise that the NZ plans are that close. You making me more envious now - Taupo & a split cane rod! :D

Well done mate.
 

Rockdoc

New member
WM,

Thanks for your detailed post. I understand that it's an involved and messy process and fully appreciate what you say about the proof being in the pudding... There'll be some pressure on next season for this fisher to christen it with a fish!:D

Leighton, thanks for that...not all of my former clients would agree but they were the kind of t**ts that were trying to get something for nothing by disputing invoices!:(

AP
 
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